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Plant substances in fruits and vegetables help you lose weight


Certain types of fruits and vegetables promote weight loss
Many people want to lose weight. At the beginning of the year, most people decided to lose some weight. In order to achieve this goal, a wide variety of diets are tried out or contracts signed in the gym. But there could be a much easier way to keep the weight off or even lose some weight.

Overweight is a big problem these days. Many sufferers desperately try to maintain or lose weight. Most people trust sports or diets. Scientists, however, are now claiming that there is a simple trick to using special foods to maintain weight and possibly even lose some weight. The researchers published the results of their study in the British Medical Journal (BMJ).

Flavonoids help maintain weight and prevent cell damage
Research from Harvard University and the University of East Anglia has shown that certain fruits and vegetables can help people maintain a normal weight. Apples, pears, blueberries, strawberries and radishes can therefore prevent weight gain. These fruits and vegetables contain a high level of flavonoids. Only about 80g of such food a day significantly improve our health, say the doctors. Flavonoids are phytonutrients that are found in various foods and beverages, including a wide range of fruits and vegetables, tea, chocolate, and wine. They are considered to be particularly healthy because of their antioxidant effect, since it is believed that this can prevent cell damage.

Study examines nearly 125,000 people
For their study, the American experts examined the data from 124,086 men and women over a period of 24 years. They found that consuming a small amount of flavonoids can help maintain a healthy body weight and even lose a little weight. The research focused on three large groups of people: women with an average age of 36 years, women with the age of 48 and men with an average age of 47, the researchers explained. This is the first large study to try to establish the relationship between flavonoids and weight gain, emphasizes Professor Aedin Cassidy of the "Norwich Medical School".

Flavonoid polymers and flavonols are particularly effective
Most adults gain weight as they age. Even small weight gains can have a significant impact on our risk of high blood pressure, heart disease, cancer or diabetes, warn the doctors. They found that increased consumption of flavonoids can cause modest weight loss, said Prof. Cassidy. This was observed in women and men of all ages. It would even be possible to lose small amounts of weight, which leads to an improvement in overall health. A single serving of these fruits a day has a significant impact on health, the doctor added. Flavonoid polymers are particularly useful and are found in many teas or apples, for example. So-called flavonols, which can be found in different teas and onions, are also very effective, the researchers explain.

Many people eat too little fruit and vegetables
The results can help improve previous dietary recommendations and guidelines to prevent possible obesity and its consequences. The scientists say that the risk of diabetes, cancer, high blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases can be reduced. In the United States, most people consume little fruit and even fewer vegetables a day. A lot of people eat less than the recommended daily dose, the experts explain. By consuming certain fruits and vegetables that contain many flavonoids, it is even possible to achieve health benefits. For example, the current study suggests that eating fruits and vegetables that are high in flavonoids can help people maintain a healthy weight, said Tracy Parker, nutritionist at the British Heart Foundation. However, it is important to carry out further studies to fully understand the benefits of such food. However, the results of the study confirm once again that a balanced diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, together with regular physical activity, helps to maintain a healthy weight. (as)

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